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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
the world's first true world war. his attack on the french in the western pennsylvania wilderness grew into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britai
in the kentucky wilderness on sunday, february 12, he entered a world as harsh and primitive as if he had been born a thousand years earlier. there was no doctor. simply giving birth put his mother's life in mortal danger. the only help available with the old granny women as they called her, who was summoned from miles away. a newborn baby was washed up in water and carried up a hill from a chirping spring, wrapped in animal fur and laid on a bed of dried up corn husks on a mud floor. now in later years, lincoln would allow his political supporters to glamorize his frontier roots. they made him out to be a sort of backless superman, but the log cabin had no romance for him. lincoln knew first-hand the dead-end life of an undeveloped economy. all the hardship and sorrow of what was called vintage living. his strongest boyhood memories were of death and near-death. the time he almost drowned as a boy. the time he was knocked cold by a kicking horse. his younger brother, his mother and his best friend in the world. this boy blessed with a naturally brilliant mind felt like an alien on a hostile p
chicken, some neck. >> rose: when, back to '93, '40, when he had been in the wilderness, 29, and had seen the coming of hitler and argued passionately within the counsel of government. how was that received at that time? >> well, in the middle of the 30s he was regarded as a real nuisance because he was talking about hitler but he was also making a fuss about other issues about india, all the an by-- abdication in which he was felt to be way out on opinions. and the feeling is winston is making a fuss because he wants to get back into office. by 38y, 39y, particularly after munich there is a strong sense, actually, although winston is a nuisance he's right on the fundamental thing. and he is the great advantage for churchill is that when war comes, he is in a position of not having been tainted. he's not got dirty hands. he has a really clear record. can speak with authority. and there is an overwhelming desire to see him back in government. >> and he manages an extraordinary passage for the british parliament because there was this growing unease, particularly after munich, so many peopl
this is still in its early stages, gap spent a decade in the wilderness, but last year under leadership of glen murphy, manna from heaven, the company got its act together. one of the few retailers with multiple successful contacts. not like limited and urban limited being strong too. we have gap, banana republic and old navy. and these brands are being managed well with a focus on stocking stores with merchandise people actually like. i think the stock could have a big multiyear run ahead of it. mickey set it up, then some other guys took over, kind of ran it into the ground. murphy is bringing it back. i am not the only person who has noticed the changes. a terrific article in the company about the latest edition of adage, like the "wall street journal" of marketing. the title says it all "mind the gap retailer's fashion's brands resurgence. social savvy ads and a bit of good timing help retailer come back into style. i like the trades for ideas. that was a good one. beyond more appealing merchandise, gap is doing a number of things to grow the business. the company closing stores in the unit
, but not these particular people. and, in fact, the gossip was much wilder than the reality. he had a--it was said that he built the lying-in hospital in new york to take care of all the pregnancies that he was responsible. c-span: lying-in? >> guest: lying-in is a maternity hospital. we don't use that term anymore, although in boston it's still called the boston lying-in. he did actually build that hospital, but there was a less-lurid explanation. his best friend and physician was a man named james w. markoe, who was an obstetrician, and he wanted to build a hospital that would give up-to-date, first-class care to poor women who couldn't afford it. and morgan gave them $1 million to build the hospital and gave $100,000 to it for the rest of his life, which is not what we think of about j.p. morgan, that he was helping poor women have children under the best possible circumstances. c-span: did you spend 15 years on this one subject? >> guest: on j. p. morgan? c-span: yes. c-span: yes. >> guest: yes. but it isn't one subject, it's about 30. c-span: but this one book. >> guest: yes, this one book took me 15
the country, so he began preaching about a sense of new national peril as a voice in the wilderness. most of his peers at the top of what became the leader party opposed his new militarism, especially israel's second prime minister. and he was a man who most americans had not heard of, and he believed passionately that israel's security could only be assured through a strategy of peaceful integration which required compromise and accommodation with the arabs. nasser, the egyptian military dictator who had taken over in 1952, carried on a secret correspondence with him facilitated by our central intelligence agency whose officers believed that israel and egypt could come to terms. yet at the time, the policies based on diplomacy, negotiation, integration was anathema to ben-gurion. where ben-gurion said we should get ready for war as a nation, his cabinet, however, said no. its members were listening to sharon who was listening to president eisenhower and to john foster dulles about a new world order of the u.n. charter, about the strategic importance of peace and of conflict resolution by
in the wilderness of judea, proclaiming "repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near." >> john the baptist was a renowned kind of eccentric, it appears, from the way that josephus describes him. but he seems to have had this quality of a kind of prophetic figure, one who was calling for change. so he is usually thought of as being off in the desert wearing unusual clothes-- a kind of ascetic almost. >> john is taking people out into the desert, crossing the jordan. he is recapitulating the exodus, and he is planting little, ticking time bombs of apocalyptic expectation all over the jewish homeland, waiting for god to strike, as it were. >> narrator: it was as john's disciple, the gospels say, that jesus submitted to the ancient jewish rite of baptism. >> the evidence that jesus was a follower of john is as strong as anything historians can find about jesus. the reason is a certain embarrassment in the texts, trying to explain why on earth would jesus be apparently inferior to john. if he goes and is baptized by john, then somehow we have to explain how that can happen. >> the gospels then
a pretty good rally. dagen: apple maps so that the people got stranded in the wilderness in australia. [ laughter ] connell: all right, charles. dagen: thank you very much. connell: there is no reason to jump on it. more from michigan. unions protesting this right to work legislation. we will take you there. dagen: more soldiers being booted from the military because they are just too big. take a look at world currency today. is it time to plan a trip yet. that would be a big no. ♪ >> 22 minutes past the hour. severe weather continue to pound parts of the bid west. the slow-moving storm dumped ten and a half inches in just 24 hours. the twin cities have seen almost as much snow already has all of last winter. a 31-year-old man is shot, execution style, while walking down the street yesterday. police are now looking for two suspects. medics rushed the victim to the hospital where he died. defense attorneys for. to asking a judge to and gps monitoring. those are your headlines. dagen: thank you. british banking giant agreeing to pay almost $2 billion. more than $1.9 billion. a record
. lots of directions ead people to be stranded in the wilderness . 40 miles from desired destinations. already a number of high-profile executives at apple have left. dagen: you can seriously get lost. it is dangerous. twitter and instagram have broken up. instagram pulled all of its images from twitter last night. they are no longer instantly visible. you can still see them, but you have to click on a direct link as opposed to automatically see the photo. the founder of instagram says they wanted to take photo previews off of twitter to drive traffic back to their own site. of course, instagram is owned by facebook. connell: you think it is annoying when 1% doesn't stop talking or just keeps getting up on the airline. talking through the safety demonstration. they do not like it when you do that. complaining about the lack of space in the overhead department. stuffing too much in the overhead compartment. oh, no, no, no. clicking people's fingers to get a flight attendant attentioo, which is annoying on or off the plane. dagen: that is obnoxious. i have caught myself doing that. hey,
he east of wilder road had and they were on the shoulder of the highway when a car lost control and slab into the side of the fire engine. if three firefighters and the driver of the car were injured in this crash. here is the photo of the firefighters who were hurt. they are michael rattary, kelley morris and stephen rogness. they were taken to john muir medical center in walnut creek. two of the firefighters needed to have surgery. all three are expected to survive. >> a 14 year-old boy charged as an adult with attempted murder, sexual assault and kidnapping of a 65 year-old woman is scheduled to be arraigned today. he will appear in court where he is expected to be arraigned today. >> san jose has marked its 43rd homicide of the year. matching a two decade high. the most recent hamas i was a 17 year-old boy who was gunned down on a residential street on friday. if the killings is believed to be gang-related. the 43 homicides so far this year atop the 41 killings last year. the 2011 total was double the previous year's number of homicides. >> oakland police officials have made
-term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical w
, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical workers and our
a bond company and they sold it to a bigger company. she went away into the wilderness. she's now founded her company again. >> she's men a plbeen a player while, significant in other own right. >> she's a remarkable woman. >> municipal bonds has everything to do with things we've been talking about in terms of financial health of the states, which is not great. you have to go state by state and make sure that you know what you're doing. you know, she's obviously the biggest proponent. i wish she'd start doing those commercials again. >> exactly. >> those things were so cool. iconic. >> they were. i love her. >> andy, you've come out with top picks from star investors. technology. >> these are, again, sort of out-of-the-box picks. align makes those invisible braces for your teeth. >> invisalign. >> i was thinking of getting those, yeah. >> and those things are really huge. pentair makes water filtration systems, obviously, you know, globally. that's an incredible business right now. water is a precious commodity. public storage is exactly what it sounds like, all those storage containers.
their destination into a desert wilderness. some folkings were stranded for a day without food or water. apple has told cnn its working very hard to fix its maps. i think that goes to show it never hurts to have the old handy dandy real physical map in your hand. >> somebody tells you, you make a left turn at this street. >> if you're trying to get into the city and you're amongst the brush, you may have taken a wrong turn somewhere. >>> you may not know her name but she was certainly one of the most influential hispanic women on both sides of the u.s./mexico border. up next, jenni rivera's rise from poverty to superstardom. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to w
that we should not be crying out in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not activelyhoose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in completing the outstanding work. i urge my colleagues to join me in opposing today's rule so we can try to get
in nine states as protected wilderness, including a 5,300 acre national monument to protect fossils located north of las cru kr*e s, new mexico. -- i can say senator bingaman is among the greatest who set aside public land for future generations, people like roosevelt and others. senator bingaman takes his rightful place there. mr. president, for the last three decades in this body senator bingaman has been a tireless advocate for the people of new mexico, a determined champion for the future of clean and renewable energy for the united states. he's been an outstanding senator, a wonderful friend. i join with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in wishing jeff and ann the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, with that, i yield the floor. and i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. gillibrand: i rise today to urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support our efforts to come to the relief of millions of
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)